January 31, 2017 STEM Equity Pipeline Archived Webinar

Complimentary 1-hour webinar! “Improving Women’s Access to In-Demand Technical Middle-Skill Jobs: A New Methodology to Address Occupational Segregation in CTE and Workforce Development”

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Sponsored by NAPE, STEM Equity Pipeline, and the National Science Foundation.

Register Today!

Description

This webinar will address two issues: (1) the need to improve women’s access to well-paid middle-skill jobs (jobs that require at least a high school diploma but less than a bachelor’s degree) and (2) the role of support services such as childcare in nontraditional CTE programs for increasing gender equity in  middle-skill technical fields. Women are fewer than 1 in 10 workers in well-paid jobs in advanced manufacturing, transportation and logistics, and construction, and fewer than 3 in 10 in middle-skill IT jobs. A typical worker in a traditionally female middle-skill job earns only 66 cents for every dollar made by a typical worker in a nontraditional middle-skill job for women.  Yet lower paid female-dominated jobs often share many of the occupational characteristics of the higher paid nontraditional jobs.

The webinar will introduce a new web tool (www.womenandgoodjobs.org) and methodology (based on the U.S. Department of Labor’s O*Net database) to identify lower paid predominantly female occupations that share many of the characteristics of the “target” well-paid middle-skill occupations and can serve as “on-ramp” to good middle-skill jobs for women seeking to improve their earnings. It will also share new research on the role of support services (such as childcare and transportation assistance) in helping women complete CTE programs and pursue employment in nontraditional fields.

Intended Audience

Secondary, community college, and state-level administrators/faculty/staff and program coordinators/counselors/advisors interested in increasing the participation and completion and job placement of underrepresented students in nontraditional CTE programs.

Objectives

Participants will

  • Understand the potential of skill shortages and demographic change for improving women’s access to well-paid middle-skill jobs.
  • Gain access to the latest facts and understand the role of occupational gender segregation in middle-skill technical jobs and CTE for women’s economic security.
  • Learn about a new web tool and methodology to highlight lower paid female-dominated jobs that share characteristics with better paid growing male-dominated jobs, and that may serve as “on-ramps” for women seeking CTE and as advancement to improve their earnings.
  • Learn about the latest research on the role of support-services, such as childcare, in helping women succeed in nontraditional CTE.

Presenters

Ariane Hegewisch, Program Director, Employment and Earnings, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Areas of expertise: Work Life Reconciliation, Work Family Policy, Occupational Segregation, Gender Wage Gap, Workplace Flexibility, Gender Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Pay Equity, Working Time Policies, Paid Leave, Job Quality and Job Training

Chandra Childers, PhD, Senior Research Scientist, Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Areas of expertise: Social and Economic Inequality, Stratification, Race and Gender, Occupational Segregation

Elyse Shaw, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Women’s Policy Research
Areas of expertise: Employment, Economic Security, Political Parity, Inequality, Race and Intersectionality, Gender and Urbanization, and Gender and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding

Registration

Register for this 1-hour complimentary webinar on Tuesday, January 31, 2017, beginning at 2 pm ET. Once you register for the complimentary event, information and instructions about accessing the event will be sent to your email address

nsf1 high res December 13, 2016 STEM Equity Pipeline Archived Webinar This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. HRD-0734056 and Grant No. HRD 1203121. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.